Last week, a group of University of Georgia students traveled to Madison to present potential design plans for the Fifth Street Garden project.

“Our site development team was blown away by the incredible mid-project presentations of our future garden design by UGA Landscape Design students,” said the Fifth Street Garden Club members after the presentations. “We feel so fortunate that Dr. Shelley Canady chose our community garden as the project for her class.”

A plot of land located at 664 Fifth Street in Madison has been cleared with the intention of creating a community garden.

University of Georgia landscape design students, under the guidance of Professor Canady, provided various design options for Fifth Street Community Garden.

“Fifth Street Community Garden is deeply committed to enhancing community resilience and providing educational opportunities for young and old inspired by a vision of sustainability that honors and protects our earth,” said the non-profit organization, the Madison-Morgan Community Garden (MMCG).

The new community garden aims “to be a welcoming place that celebrates the uniqueness and diversity of our community through personal interaction linked with gardening practices that increase local food sources.”

Once the garden is completed, there will be raised beds throughout the property for interested community members to grow their own vegetables and flowers.

According to the MMCG, the vision for the Fifth Street Community garden was born last year.

“In 2020, a small group of concerned Morgan County citizens formed to identify ways they could improve sustainability and social justice within the local community. Their efforts evolved into a community garden to improve availability of local food sources while offering activities that bring together people of diverse backgrounds, ages, races, and faiths,” said the non-profit organization. “They have also developed partnerships with the educational community to provide learning opportunities for students through the school system, the local extension office, and the Boys & Girls Club.”