The collector who resides in this refined New York City pad has relied on Aamir Khandwala, of Aamir Khandwala Interior Design, to decorate her homes since the 1990s—when Khandwala was Robert Couturier’s head of decoration. For three decades, she has returned to him for distinctive and rich design that endures. “As I walk into a home that Aamir has completed for me, I am instantly reminded why I choose Aamir each time: to make my world full of beauty, grace, and comfort,” she says. “He and I hit it off from the very beginning. Not only does he have exceptional taste, he also listens to his clients carefully and designs solely for them, keeping their needs in mind and his own ego out.” The result is a unique and sophisticated mélange, reflecting his own aesthetics and his clients’ personalities.

<div class="caption"> The master bedroom features an 1850s bed from Goa, India—which was sourced from <a href="https://anglorajantiques.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Anglo Raj Antiques" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Anglo Raj Antiques</a>. It is decorated with antique ikat-patterned panels from Paris and cushions featuring fabric from <a href="https://www.combraydesign.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Combray Design" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Combray Design</a>. The chair is from Paris-based designer Mattia Bonetti and the rug is from <a href="https://www.meridastudio.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Merida Rugs" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Merida Rugs</a>. </div>
The master bedroom features an 1850s bed from Goa, India—which was sourced from Anglo Raj Antiques. It is decorated with antique ikat-patterned panels from Paris and cushions featuring fabric from Combray Design. The chair is from Paris-based designer Mattia Bonetti and the rug is from Merida Rugs.

The brilliance of this two-bedroom home lies in its feeling both lived-in and polished. This is because Khandwala believes in enhancing how one chooses to live. “Design is so intuitive,” he says. “Once you have it in your DNA, you go about it in a very natural way. Rather than thinking too hard about how one should live, instead you think about how one is living.” From room to room, Khandwala has focused on blending pieces, presenting harmonious and multitextured scenes. This begins in the entrance, which combines the gel of the 1960s table from designer Wendell Castle and the leather of the Mauritanian rug from RW Guild. Throughout, the bones of this loftlike home—which include industrial details, like dark-colored columns and glass doors—have been eased with delicate choices, including the hand-blown glass light fixture from designer Jeff Zimmerman that crowns the home office.

To realize this, Khandwala builds his rooms up from the floor. “I think it’s important to have the right rug in the room,” he notes. “I feel like it’s the foundation of the room.” From there, he works around the space, decorating the ceilings and the walls before considering the furnishings. “My mind has always been inclined to think in layers,” he adds. This process is seen in the living room, which features a grand Turkish oushak rug from the 1700s. Its tones, including blushes and bronzes, have been translated in the furnishings. The couch from Liaigre has been re-covered in rose-colored linen, and the three tables from designer Gloria Cortina reflect the golden hues. Even the pops—such as the custom pillows from textile makers Hechizoo and Makrosha—live inside this scheme.

Tour a Loft That Seamlessly Blends Patina and Polish

<div class="caption"> The entrance of a New York City loft designed by Aamir Khandwala for a longtime client is multitextured, between the gel of the 1960s table from designer <a href="https://www.wendellcastle.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Wendell Castle" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Wendell Castle</a> and the leather of the Mauritanian rug from <a href="https://rwguild.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:RW Guild" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">RW Guild</a>. In the kitchen, gemlike hanging lights from designer <a href="https://www.come.fr/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Christophe Côme" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Christophe Côme</a> brighten the island, which is lined with black stools from <a href="https://www.gestaltnewyork.com/grazia-co" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Grazia and Co" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Grazia and Co</a>. </div>
The entrance of a New York City loft designed by Aamir Khandwala for a longtime client is multitextured, between the gel of the 1960s table from designer Wendell Castle and the leather of the Mauritanian rug from RW Guild. In the kitchen, gemlike hanging lights from designer Christophe Côme brighten the island, which is lined with black stools from Grazia and Co.
<div class="caption"> A swinging light from <a href="https://www.alliedmaker.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Allied Maker" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Allied Maker</a> defines the dining space. The dark wood–framed mirror from France was first purchased when Khandwala was designing for one of his client’s homes in Aspen. </div>
A swinging light from Allied Maker defines the dining space. The dark wood–framed mirror from France was first purchased when Khandwala was designing for one of his client’s homes in Aspen.
<div class="caption"> The scheme for the living room starts with the Turkish <em>oushak</em> rug. The couch from <a href="https://www.liaigre.com/en/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Liaigre" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Liaigre</a>—which has been recovered to match in linen from <a href="https://www.angelabrownltd.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Angela Brown, Ltd." class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Angela Brown, Ltd.</a>—is decorated with custom pillows from textile makers <a href="https://hechizoo.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Hechizoo" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Hechizoo</a> and <a href="https://makrosha.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Makrosha" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Makrosha</a>. The tones in the rug match the bronze in the end tables from designer Gilbert Poillerat and the nesting tables from designer <a href="https://gloriacortina.mx/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Gloria Cortina" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Gloria Cortina</a>. The poufs were sourced from <a href="https://artemest.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Artemest" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Artemest</a>. </div>
The scheme for the living room starts with the Turkish oushak rug. The couch from Liaigre—which has been recovered to match in linen from Angela Brown, Ltd.—is decorated with custom pillows from textile makers Hechizoo and Makrosha. The tones in the rug match the bronze in the end tables from designer Gilbert Poillerat and the nesting tables from designer Gloria Cortina. The poufs were sourced from Artemest.
<div class="caption"> This nook, dedicated to practicing meditation, has touches of leather, from the chrome-framed chair to the Mauritanian rug from <a href="https://rwguild.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:RW Guild" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">RW Guild</a>. The hanging light from <a href="https://www.thefutureperfect.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:The Future Perfect" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">The Future Perfect</a> is made from banana fiber; the lantern is from designer Tonino Negri. </div>
This nook, dedicated to practicing meditation, has touches of leather, from the chrome-framed chair to the Mauritanian rug from RW Guild. The hanging light from The Future Perfect is made from banana fiber; the lantern is from designer Tonino Negri.
<div class="caption"> A painting by Giorgio Cavallon is poised between the kitchen and the living room. This corner is filled with Scandinavian furniture, including the chairs, in alpaca, and the commode, which was sourced from <a href="https://www.dienstanddotter.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Dienst + Dotter" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Dienst + Dotter</a>. The bold-colored lamp is from designer Roberto Rida. </div>
A painting by Giorgio Cavallon is poised between the kitchen and the living room. This corner is filled with Scandinavian furniture, including the chairs, in alpaca, and the commode, which was sourced from Dienst + Dotter. The bold-colored lamp is from designer Roberto Rida.
<div class="caption"> Even the home office packs a punch, thanks to the Haas Brothers’ <em>La Brea Brad Pitt</em> mammoth rug. Antique pieces like the Portuguese cabinet have been blended with modern ones like the Oka desk. The hanging light from designer Jeff Zimmerman is made from handblown glass. </div>

Even the home office packs a punch, thanks to the Haas Brothers’ La Brea Brad Pitt mammoth rug. Antique pieces like the Portuguese cabinet have been blended with modern ones like the Oka desk. The hanging light from designer Jeff Zimmerman is made from handblown glass.

<div class="caption"> The guest bedroom is home to leather accents: the antique Danish chairs and the headboard from <a href="https://www.the-citizenry.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:The Citizenry" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">The Citizenry</a>. The art includes <em>Ice Cream Cone</em> by Donald Baechler and <em>Yellow</em> by Malcolm Morley. The custom curtains feature a blend of fabrics—cashmere from <a href="https://www.hollandandsherry.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Holland & Sherry" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Holland & Sherry</a> and wool from <a href="https://www.angelabrownltd.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Angela Brown Ltd." class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Angela Brown Ltd.</a>—and the rug, in alpaca, was sourced from <a href="https://www.altforliving.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:ALT For Living" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">ALT For Living</a>. </div>
The guest bedroom is home to leather accents: the antique Danish chairs and the headboard from The Citizenry. The art includes Ice Cream Cone by Donald Baechler and Yellow by Malcolm Morley. The custom curtains feature a blend of fabrics—cashmere from Holland & Sherry and wool from Angela Brown Ltd.—and the rug, in alpaca, was sourced from ALT For Living.
<div class="caption"> The master bedroom features an 1850s bed from Goa, India, sourced from <a href="https://anglorajantiques.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Anglo Raj Antiques" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Anglo Raj Antiques</a>. It is decorated with antique ikat-patterned panels from Paris and cushions featuring fabric from <a href="https://www.combraydesign.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Combray Design" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Combray Design</a>. The chair is from Paris-based designer Mattia Bonetti and the rug is from <a href="https://www.meridastudio.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Merida Rugs" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Merida Rugs</a>. </div>
The master bedroom features an 1850s bed from Goa, India, sourced from Anglo Raj Antiques. It is decorated with antique ikat-patterned panels from Paris and cushions featuring fabric from Combray Design. The chair is from Paris-based designer Mattia Bonetti and the rug is from Merida Rugs.
<div class="caption"> Khandwala likes to reserve the bold hues for the bathrooms. For this one, he chose <a href="https://www.farrow-ball.com/en-us" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Farrow & Ball" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Farrow & Ball</a>’s Arsenic, which contrasts with the mirror’s blue-glass frame. The towels come from Nancy Stanley Waud Fine Linens. </div>
Khandwala likes to reserve the bold hues for the bathrooms. For this one, he chose Farrow & Ball’s Arsenic, which contrasts with the mirror’s blue-glass frame. The towels come from Nancy Stanley Waud Fine Linens.

Throughout, the design is curated and deliberate. Each piece has been included for a reason—even the surfboard in the living room, which belongs to the resident’s son. “We’re living in this day where everything is so disposable, but things shouldn’t be disposable,” says Khandwala. “Things should be important. They should be things that you collect. That doesn’t meant that they should be expensive, but they should have emotion. They should be things that create emotion.”

Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest